iPrincipal:The care and feeding of your iPad

iPrincipal (3) Click on the iPrincipal (3) link to open on a new page with all pictures and links.

iPrincipal

The care and feeding of your iPad

by Dr. Keith Ingram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The purpose of this article is to share useful information in regards to selecting appropriate apps, word processing, presentations, and file storage. This article should demonstrate to you if your iPad is a viable replacement for your pc laptop.

 

Topics Covered:

 

  Apps

  Word Processing

  Presentations

  File Storage

  Photography

  E-mail

  To Do List

  iCal-Calendar

  Reading Apps

  Digital File Cabinet

  PC remote access

  Built in Apps

  ibooks

  Printing

  FACE TIME

  Miscellaneous Apps

 

 

 

 

 

 

In his book Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell looked at the factors that helped differentiate high-performers. One of the findings his work popularized was the idea of 10,000 hours of practice. He found that top performance in a domain is highly correlated to spending 10,000 hours practicing that activity. Administrators at any level, can’t afford to spend 10,000 hours or Ten Years becoming an expert (From Dr. K. Anders Ericsson) on our iPads. It is the goal of this article to help all of us to function within ourselves and through deliberate practice we can work smarter and not harder.

 

 

Are you a bit frustrated with all the documents and e-mails (168 million E-mails every 60 seconds) that are flying all around in cyber space? It seems like they all land in your in-box and you have to decide what to do with them all? It can be frustrating and discouraging. My best friend and I have a favorite quote that we both enjoy and use all the time. “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” -Albert Einstein. With information overload coming our way and at an  increasing exponential pace, we must do something different with e-information or we will go INSANE. 

 

 

Today’s students are Digital Natives. Before they leave elementary school, they can write in Word, build a PowerPoint Presentation complete with graphics, sound effects and hyperlinks. They all ready know how to text on smart phones that have more computing power than the Apollo space ship of the 70’s, have interacted with friends and family around the globe via video chat and look forward to completing homework and playing games on their own laptops, smartphones, and iPads. In order to reach these 21st century learners, educators today must know and use technology tools that help capture student interest and enhance the learning environment. 

 

Educational leaders must set the tone in their schools as we must set the stage in every area, especially technology integration and usage. The technology integration  must be implemented by students, teachers and administrators. As administrators,  we can’t be left behind in the area of technology (N.A.L.B. -No Administrator/Teacher Left Behind). Our collective goal is to Leave No Administrator/Teacher Behind while not having to spend 10,000 hours trying to get there. This article should make using your iPad, iEasy, iEnjoyable and iEffective (iE3).

 

WorkFlow

 

The iPad is quickly becoming a real tool and increasing productivity when in the hands of educators. It is very important to know what it can do and then make it do what you want it to do so that it can be an integral part of your desktop at work or home. In this article, you’ll learn how to make the iPad your top assistant and how to use the essential apps and select the best workflow apps that should make you more productive.  The apps that have been selected are based on the following six criteria.

 

 

  1. 1.    App is FREE or low cost.
  2. 2.    Top Ten Must Have Apps list.
  3. 3.    App has high productivity value.
  4. 4.    Rated Four or more stars on Apple App Store.
  5. 5.    App has been used and tested by fellow Administrators.
  6. 6.    App is immediately intuitive (iE3).

It will be up to you to decide if you want to make your iPad your primary work computer or if you will use it on a limited basis for classroom observations and providing teacher feedback.

 

Accessory #1

 

This is the #1 item that you really must consider to add to your iPad so that it can do all that you want it to do. You absolutely must invest in a good quality keyboard. You can use the built in Apple keyboard for a short period of time but many educators report they start having wrist problems very quickly. There are many keyboards to choose from and it is up to your personnel preference which one to choose.  The wireless Bluetooth connectivity in a key board with a protective covering, feels right for you. Some keyboards have a more rubbery feel and give little feedback. Some educators need to hear the click when pressing the keys. Really nice quality leather covered keyboards props up the iPad for viewing and protection (prices range from $79-$199). Detachable keyboards are susceptible to being left behind in a classroom.

 

Core Workflow Apps

Using your iPad is really a very personal experience and the way you determine how to use it will determine how much you get out of it and the experiences that you can have. Our goal should be that we find a way to make your iPad a reliable tool that will help you develop a reliable workflow. You can harness the power of numerous apps to help you keep all your information organized and add to your leadership effectiveness.

 

The real key to managing your app workflow is to limit the number of places where actionable information resides. This article will try and narrow down the focus of the thousands of apps available and help you select the best ones have been tried and tested by fellow administrators. 

 

Word Processing  

 

Notability

Cost: $2.99-.99

Rating: Four plus stars

Description:

Notability is a very basic note taking app. It is a not a free app but offers most of the tools required to take notes. It accepts handwriting which is a plus. It can link notes to and with audio recordings. Notability works with handwriting, pdf, word processing and more. It can auto sync and ensures your notes are backed up safely. It is rated four plus stars. It ranges in price from $2.99 to .99 when it goes on sale for limited times.

 

Evernote http://www.apple.com/ipad/from-the-app-store/productivity.html

Cost: Free

Rating: Four plus stars

Description: The New York Times ‘Top 10 Must-Have App’, Winner. Evernote is easy-to-use, free app that helps you remember everything across all of the devices you may use. Stay organized, save your ideas and improve productivity. It allows you to take notes, create to-do lists, record voice reminders and makes the notes searchable, whether you are at home, at work or on the go. Think of Evernote as a digital file cabinet for work that has been completed and gives you a place to store your work files. This is a free app and allows the ability to save your work.

 

Pages http://www.apple.com/iwork/pages/

Cost: $9.99

Rating: Four Plus stars

Description: Pages is the Apple version of Microsoft Word that we are all very comfortable using on our laptops for several years. Pages is a very easy interface to use and to write just about anything you might need. Pages does cost $9.99 from the Apple App store and rarely if ever goes on sale. You can add pictures, charts, graphs, tables, and shapes. You can change the document setup. My recommendation is that if you can afford it, it is really the best word processing that I have come across so far. Pages works with the iCloud, so your documents stay up to date across all your devices, automatically.

 

Pages for iPad is the ultimate mobile word processor. Similar to a Mac or PC. And, with the iPad’s 9.7-inch screen, users can fully interact with text and images when working on a document in Pages for iPad. As a new user, New users can type up lecture notes, and it works like a charm. Formatting is quick and easy, and can be done either through selecting various preset styles, or through customization via a toolbar at the top of the application. Once you’ve added images (from the iPad’s Photos app), you can drag them around with your finger to reposition them, and easily rotate images with 2 fingers or resize them by holding a corner and dragging out or in. If you want to review a document you’ve created, enter fullscreen mode and scroll through the .pages file in its entirety.  Once you’re completely satisfied with the way your document has turned out, you can save it (as a Pages, Word, or PDF file), or email it within the application. Pages is available in the App Store for $9.99. While some might consider this price to be a little too high to purchase while on a teacher or administrator budget, Pages for iPad is worth it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

OneNote:

Cost: Free

Rating: Four plus stars

Descriptions: OneNote is now available as a free download. This is one of the very best free programs that runs on your pc from Microsoft. It’s the perfect way to stay organized on the go. You can create notes, lists and to-dos no matter where you are and, best of all, you’ll never lose them. It’s easy to create notes on the go. Use text photos, bullets, checklists  or all of the above. It’s easy to find what you need. You can store and access multiple notebooks within the app. This program can be synced up to to your pc and can save files in both places. This is a “must have app”.

 

 

Presentations

 

 

 

 

 

PowerPoint

Cost: $16.99 listed as Documents to Go

Rating: Four plus stars

Description:

 

Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 gives you more ways to create and share dynamic presentations with your audience than ever before. Exciting new audio and visual capabilities help you tell a crisp, cinematic story thats as easy to create as it is powerful to watch. We all have most likely used PowerPoint for sometime. You can still use your PowerPoint skills if you use Logmein or OnLive Desktop (free apps). Logmein and OnLive Desktop apps are described later in the article.

 

You can purchase Documents to go from Microsoft Office for $16.99 and you can access Word, Excel and PowerPoint from your Ipad and sink to your pc.

 

In addition, PowerPoint 2010 enables you to work simultaneously with other people or post your presentation online and access it from virtually anywhere using the Web or your smartphone. Embed and edit video from within PowerPoint. Now you can add fades, formatting effects, bookmark scenes, and trim videos to give your presentations a professional multimedia experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 Keynote http://www.apple.com/ipad/from-the-app-store/apps-by-apple/keynote.html

Cost: $9.99

Rating: Four plus stars

Description:

  Keynote is the Apple version of PowerPoint. Keynote works well on iPads and it is pretty simple to get used to if you have worked on Microsofts version of PowerPoint. You can create  a presentation in Keynote like you have in Powerpoint. Creating a presentation in Keynote is very simple to do. If you spend the money and make the transition to Keynote, you won’t regret it. This is also a “must have app”.

 

To make Keynote fully functional you will need to purchase a splitter. This item will connect to your iPad and your lcd projector so you can present your Keynote to an audience.  You can purchase the splitter at the Apple store or Best Buy($29). You hook one end to the only port (30 pin) on your iPad and the other to your presentation station that you normally hook up to your laptop.  You might want to get an extension cable that you can add to this device so you are not tethered so closely to the projector. You can buy a 10 foot cable also at Radio Shack or Best Buy for around $25.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can plug your iPad directly into the teacher workstation and project your iPad image up on the teacher White Board or Smart board running thru the LCD screen projector. It took a few seconds to plug in the splitter and the iPad was found by the screen in a few seconds and up it went right up on the big screen, simply amazing.

 

 

Keynote is the most powerful presentation app ever designed for a mobile device. Built from the ground up for iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch, it makes creating a world-class presentation complete with animated charts and transitions — as simple as touching and tapping. Use full-screen view to present right on your iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch. Or use video mirroring to present it on an HDTV, and preview your slides and notes on your device using the presenter display. Keynote works with iCloud, so your presentations stay up to date across all your iOS devices  automatically. Keynote is rated four plus stars out of five.

 

 

 

 

 

iPad 2 Built in Apps:  http://www.apple.com/ipad/built-in-apps/

 

Cost: Free, they come with your iPad already installed.

Rating: Four plus stars.

Description: There are many built in apps that you may not even be familiar with and you should be familiar with what your iPad can do for you before you look elsewhere.

 

 

E-mail  

 

Mail   http://www.apple.com/ipad/built-in-apps/

Cost: Free, This is a built in App.

Mail is the built in app loaded on iPad and it works beautifully and I have found no need to add any supplemental apps to add any features. You can load multiple e-mail accounts and view them in combination or separately. The e-mail is very easy to use and one of the best functions on the iPad. Mail creates really smart messages.

Mail in iPad goes above and beyond regular email. It converts URLs, phone numbers, email addresses, dates, and street addresses to links. Just tap a link and go straight to Safari, Contacts, Calendar, or Maps.

 

 

 

 

 

Messages http://www.apple.com/ipad/built-in-apps/

Cost: Free this is a built in App

Description:

 

Bring on the FYIs and the TMIs, the LOLs and the OMGs. Text messaging with iMessage is now on iPad and its unlimited between all iOS 5 users. And free over Wi-Fi.* Quick, spread the word. If you hate lugging around your clunky walkie talkie you can contact your fellow administrators via text messages thru their iPad or iPhone and it doesn’t cost you any of your minutes. Simply brilliant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safari http://www.apple.com/ipad/built-in-apps/  

Cost: Free this is a built in App.

Description: To call this web surfing doesnt do it justice. You hold the Internet in your hands like a book, flip through it like a magazine, and do everything with your fingers on the big, beautiful iPad display. Its like you control the whole wide web yourself.

 

Theres nothing like reading the web on an iPad. Safari Reader smartly recognizes when theres an article on the page. All you have to do is tap the Reader icon in the address bar and ads, clutter, and everything else thats not your article disappears. So theres nothing between you and your story. Running short on time? Add an article link to your Reading List so you can finish it later. iCloud automatically keeps the web pages youve saved like articles in your Reading List and favorite sites and login pages youve bookmarked up to date across all your devices.

 

iBooks http://www.apple.com/ipad/built-in-apps/ 

Cost: Free built in App.

Description: Be well read with iBooks. Download the iBooks app from the App Store. Then fill your iPad library with books including a whole new kind of textbook  from the iBookstore. Take them to more places than youd ever take a regular book. And from the moment you pull one out on your iPad, youll be pulled in. You can store real books and pdf’s in your iBooks library. With the newest update you can now highlight words (highlight like a marker) in your book and leave post-it like notes for review later.

 

 

iCal-Calendar http://www.apple.com/ipad/built-in-apps/

Cost: Free built in App.

Description: Again, the Apple supplied calendar works great. You could add apps to enhance it but I haven’t yet found one that does anything that iCal doesn’t already do really well. I would suggest you spend a couple minutes looking at a tutorial. One of the nice features in iCal that is sometimes overlooked is the invites to invitees (your colleagues, parents, or staff). They can reply back if they can attend the meeting. You can easily add these events to your calendar. You can view your calendar for the day, week, or the month. But you can also look at your calendar for the year and make a list also.

 

DAY                       WEEK                MONTH                 YEAR                LIST

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reminders: http://www.apple.com/ipad/built-in-apps/ 

Cost: Free built in App.

Description: The built in Reminders App is okay to use in your iPad. There are many To Do List or Task apps that many of our colleagues use every day and help bring some control over a hectic schedule. There are many of these productivity apps available.

 

 

 

Facetime  http://www.apple.com/ipad/built-in-apps/

Cost: Free built in app

Rating: Four plus stars.

Description:

For faraway friends and family, long-distance relationships, or just for fun, FaceTime for iPad is here. With a tap, you can make video calls from your iPad 2 to someone elses iPad 2, iPhone, iPod touch, or Mac over Wi-Fi.* You can be there in person, even when youre not.

 

This feature is really helpful when trying to talk to fellow colleagues, district level administrators or some parents who are in some remote place. Many educators have found it to be very easy to use and very reliable. This is a “must have app” even though you don’t have to pay for it. You should really consider using it and getting familiar with it. You can meet with people remotely instead of driving somewhere and save’s lots of time and gas money!

 

Newstand http://www.apple.com/ipad/built-in-apps/

Cost: Free built in app.

Rating: Four plus stars.

Description:

The things you love reading on iPad newspapers, magazines, journals have a new home on your Home screen. Newsstand keeps all your app subscriptions in one convenient place and makes it easy to shop for new reading material. Its your own personal reading room with the latest in whatever interests you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TO DO List:

 

Orchestra ToDo

Cost: Free

Rating: Four plus stars

Description:  Orchestra ToDo for iPhone and or iPad combines voice recognition, hashtags, and email to create an incredibly useful and agile to-do list app. There is a small learning curve to get the most out of this app, but in short time, it will become the first thing you check before you get out of bed in the morning.

 

You can access Orchestra ToDo online at orchestra.com and on your iPhone and or iPad. It automatically syncs any changes or modifications swiftly, so you will not miss a moment or an item on your to-do list. You can sign up for the app at orchestra.com or via the iPad app. The welcome screen for the iPhone app touts all of the fantastic features of the app including voice recognition, task sharing with folks without an orchestra.com account, and turning emails into tasks. Once you start follow the prompts to enter your first task, the features were great. The developers at Orchestra Inc. articulated the highly customized features and capabilities concisely and clearly.

Orchestra is sort of a poor man’s version of Siri. You can push a button and it will record your speech and then translate it into text. You can set it up to give you a reminder e-mail. You can view your list and check items off when they are completed. One of the nicest features is that you can assign a task to a co-worker(‘s) even if they don’t have Orchestra. The co-worker can then reply back that they have started the task and when it is completed. Orchestra is free app. You can find more To Do lists that are free and it really isn’t necessary to have to pay for this kind of app.

 

 

Wunderlist  

Cost: Free

Rating: Four plus stars.

Description: Wunderlist is a free To Do list/Task app. It can divide task up for today and carry them over to tomorrow. It is really an easy app to work with.  It is a free cloud-sync task manager, and you can share it with your friends. You can organize your to-do lists. It is a four plus star rated. It is an impressive looking task manager. You can even push reminder notices to yourself when you have a task due.

 

 

PC remote access

                   There will be some times when you absolutely need a file from your good old laptop computer. You may be off campus at a meeting and just need one thing from your computer. These two suggested Apps will keep you from having to drive to your school on the weekend and will allow you access to your files from home.

 

Logmein

Cost: Free

Rating: Four plus stars

Description: Remotely control your PCs and Macs over WiFi/3G with the free LogMeIn app on your iPad or iPhone. It works with LogMeIns free award-winning software installed on as many computers as you like. You can remotely access your files, run your applications and control your desktops from anywhere.   Access your information and get stuff done.

Access your home and work computers on the go.

Control your PC as if youre sitting right in front of it.

Get to your computer files and edit them from your iPad or iPhone.

Remotely run any application on your computer from your iPad or iPhone.

 

Splash-top

Cost: $4.99

Rating: Four plus stars

Description: This is the ONLY remote desktop app that streams smooth, high-res video and audio from your PC or Mac, allowing you to interact with your PowerPoint, Word, Excel, Outlook, Quicken, and other applications. Access your PC or MAC programs, games, multimedia content, and files over Wi-Fi and 3G/4G networks. Go everywhere with just your iPhone without having to carry your computer!

 

* Access your PowerPoint and Keynote with full animations and sound

 

* Access Microsoft Outlook with folders and archives

 

* Access your Excel and Word applications with 100% compatibility

 

 

 

Printing

 

Print Agent Pro

Cost: $5.99

Rating: Four plus stars.

Description: This is a $5.99 app and well worth it. It loaded easily and found many printers in my building right away. It has several ways to locate the printers some wireless, some with ip address and it was easy to set up. It has a Printer test wizard to see if your printers will work.

 

 

HP e Printer Control

Cost: $150  on sale.

Rating: Four plus stars.

Description: This is the option where you can buy an HP e-printer for around $150 and place one in your office directly. If you buy the printer it can provide a free app for download. It only needs a power cord and will print wirelessly. These printers will print, scan, copy both on paper and on photo quality paper.

 

 

iPad Reading Apps

 

ibooks    http://www.apple.com/ipad/built-in-apps/

Cost: Free, this is a built in app.

Rating: Four Plus stars.

Description:  Download iBooks from the App Store and youll be even more well-read. Every story is gripping on the beautiful iPad display. Flick through page after page of bright text and gorgeous illustrations. When youre ready for more, shop the iBookstore. And wherever you go, pull out your iPad, and get pulled back in.

Reading on iPad is just like reading a book. But once you tap to turn the first page, youll see its nothing like a book. Read one page at a time, or turn iPad on its side and view two pages at once. Tap to read everything full screen, with no distractions, or read in white-on-black nighttime mode. Even alter the look of most books by changing their text size and font.

 

 

Pocket  formerly Read it Later

Cost: Free

Rating: Four plus stars.

Description: a webpage you’d like to read but can’t at that time, save it to your Pocket list. You can then read it whenever you have a moment, whether it’s on the couch, during your commute, on the plane, train, or practically anywhere. This allows you to eliminate the cluttering of bookmarks and inboxes with links that are merely of a one-time interest. It’s like a staging area for bookmarks.

 

Instapaper

Cost: $4.99

Rating: Four plus stars.

Description: Save web pages for later offline reading, optimized for readability on your iPhone or iPod touch’s screen. Featured by Apple and critically acclaimed by top blogs, newspapers, and magazines!

 

Great for long articles and blog posts that you find during the day and would like to read, but don’t have the time when you find them. Save with Instapaper, then read later when you’re commuting, in a meeting, or waiting in line.

 

 

Digital File Cabinet

 

Evernote

Cost: Free

Rating: Four plus stars.

Description: Evernote is an easy-to-use, free app that helps you remember everything across all of the devices you use. Stay organized, save your ideas and improve productivity. Evernote lets you take notes, capture photos, create to-do lists, record voice reminders–and makes these notes completely searchable, whether you are at home, at work, or on the go.

 

Key Features:

– Sync all of your notes across the computers and devices you use

– Create and edit text notes, to-dos and task lists

– Save, sync and share files

– Record voice and audio notes

– Search for text inside images

– Organize notes by notebooks and tags

 

 

 

 

 

DropBox

Cost: Free

Rating: Four plus stars.

Description: eDropbox is a free service that lets you bring all your photos, docs, and videos anywhere. After you install Dropbox on your computer, any file you save to your Dropbox will automatically save to all your computers, your iPhone and iPad and even the Dropbox website! With the Dropbox app, you can take everything that matters to you on the go

 

CloudOn

Cost: Free

Rating: Four plus stars.

Description:CloudOn lets you use your iPad to create, view, and edit files directly in Microsoft Word®, Excel® & PowerPoint®. These applications will work the way you expect them to, and your files will look the way you want them to.

 

Want more? Of course you do!

 

CloudOn also lets you use Dropbox to manage your files. Open them, edit them, and save them right in your workspace using your Dropbox account.

 

With the ability to access, edit and store your information, CloudOn is the essential productivity tool for your iPad.

 

* IMPORTANT INFORMATION *

To use CloudOn you must have a Dropbox account. To sign up for free, visit http://www.dropbox.com. Or, you can sign up when you launch CloudOn for the first time.

 

 

 

onLiveDesktop

Cost: Free

Rating: Four plus stars.

Description:

 

   Simple PC App Access from Anywhere

  PC Microsoft® Office with 2GB cloud storage FREE*

  Full-featured document viewing and editing

  Instant-action, media-rich Windows® 7 cloud desktop

 

The new app OnLive promises to give iPad owners a Windows 7 experience on their Apple-branded tablet, including access to free cloud-storage and Microsoft Office applications. The free application (OnLive Desktop) has now launched and, though the service appears to be struggling with the initial intense demand, the results are impressive.After youve signed-up for an account (this might take a day or two to be activated, we should add), users can log-in to the OnLive Desktop application and load up their own virtual Windows 7 screen.

 

Though the service can only power a certain number of virtual desktops at any one time, I havent ever had to wait more than half a minute for OnLive Desktop to load (it loaded-up immediately just a few moments ago). Once within the loaded app and at your desktop, its possible to interact with a Windows 7 interface and a number of Microsoft Office applications for free: theres Word, Excel and PowerPoint, along with Calculator, Paint, Notepad, Sticky Notes, Windows Journal, Microsoft Surface Collage and Windows Media Player. Furthermore, a number of touch-based built-in games are included with OnLives Windows 7.

 

However, it is possible to use and interact with OnLive Desktop without spending a penny: the app is free, an account is free to create, and those two gigabytes will be enough to sync your important documents over to the service. Take a look at OnLive Desktop in the App Store now, and be sure to try it out.

 

iFlashdrive

 

The Hyper drive is a unique device that you may consider investing in if you are still not convinced with your file management on your iPad. It is the only device so far that I have found that has the ability to take the usb end, plug into your pc and have you download multiple files on to the flash drive and then successfully plug it into the 30 pin iPad and transfer the entire file to the iPad. You can select the 8GB, 16GB or the monster 32GB models. It performs really well and the iFlashdrive has a free app that takes you thru the steps to save your data.

http://www.hypershop.com/HyperDrive-iFlashDrive-8GB-p/hdifd-08.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Miscellaneous Apps

 

Calculator Pro

Cost: Free

Rating: Four plus stars

Description: Calculator Pro for iPad Free is designed for everyone looking for simplicity and functionality. The app features calculators sporting elegant interface that won’t leave anyone indifferent. Users who want to make basic calculations will definitely enjoy the standard option while math gurus will find it very handy to use a scientific calculator in landscape mode.

 

 

 

 

 

DocScan

Cost: Free

Rating:Four Plus stars

Description:

DocScan HD lets you instantly scan multi-pages document and send out when there is no scanner nearby. By having it, you can scan not only documents in sight, but also whiteboards, receipts, business cards, posters, coupons, books …etc.

 

It can fast auto-detect document edges from a picture, correct perspective distortion, remove shadows and brighten it up to produce a clear and sharp document, especially useful in a Low-Light environment.

You can draw lines or annotate on the scanned image before saving it as a PDF document.

 

 

Conducting Walkthroughs

 

PD360

Educators came together to create PD 360, the educational tool that has grown to become the world’s first and largest on-demand professional development platform. PD 360 answers the professional development issues for each teacher in any districtpoor or affluent, rural or urban.

 

On-demand professional development with PD 360 gives educators the most tools in the industry: PD 360 offers Professional development for teachers and administrators. Talk to your district if you aren’t familiar with this program.

 

 

 

Observation 360

 

Observation 360 allows district officials to use templates to perform teacher observations in the classrooms. The templates can be set at the district level and used across the district. Schools can develop their own 5×5 walk throughs with teachers input and they too can be used on the iPad with Observation 360. Our district bought our administrators our iPads with the main purpose of using them for teacher observations or to perform 5×5 walk throughs.

 

 

 

 

Can the iPad replace your laptop?

 

 

For years, analysts have debated whether tablets will eventually replace laptops. Consumers largely believe they will–and the elderly are far more convinced of that fact than whippersnappers.

 

Research from NPD DisplaySearch reported that 72.7 million tablets hit store shelves last year. That figure was easily overshadowed by notebook shipments, which rose to 187.5 million units. More germane to this subject, NPD DisplaySearch also predicted that by 2017, tablet shipments will jump to 383.3 million. Moreover, notebook shipments, are expected to hit 432 million units this year.

 

Some may not be convinced that the iPad 2 will replace a pc laptop yet. It would be fair to say that in the past six months that my iPad 2 has moved much closer to being my #1 choice for just about everything that I do at work.

 

This article may not convince you or me that your iPad can or should replace your laptop completely. It is my hope that at least you have gained enough information that you may step out a bit of your comfort zone and expand your knowledge base and use your iPad more than you are now. Please feel free to contact me if you have questions or comments at keith.ingram@cherokee.k12.ga.us  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 iPrincipal (3)iPrincipal (3)

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Does Apple hold the future of education in the palm of their hand?

Apple makes another move to acquire education

 

technology strong hold

 

by Dr. Keith Ingram

 

It’s no secret that Apple wants to have a massive presence in the education space. Most big companies do and there’s a reason for that: it’s basically an untapped market. Education technology is still in its infancy and companies like Apple and Google are charting the course with new devices like the iPad Mini.

Apple introduced more new products yesterday on October 24th to much fan fare and excitement. They provided new laptop and stand alone computers that run faster look better and are thinner and can do more than the rest of the competition. They saved what I think is the most important item to the very last, the introduction of the iPad Mini.

Before they introduced this new product they gave several bullet points worth sharing leading up to the mini iPad introduction.  

• Consumers have downloaded 35 Billion APPs from the iTunes Store .

• Apple has paid out $6 1/2 Billion to developers for these Apps.

• Apple has 1.5 million Book titles available as e-books in the iBooks store.

• Apple reports that there have been over 400 million books downloaded from the

store.

• in 2 1/2 short years Apple has sold 100 million iPads (all versions).

• They are rolling out a New Fourth generation iPad that replaces the 3rd

generation after only seven months.

• There are over 275,000 Apps available for the mini iPad.

• The Mini weighs in at 0.68 pounds which is the same as a regular size notepad

and as thin as a pencil. You can easily hold the mini iPad in one hand.

• The mini will carry 16gb of memory and have wifi and will sell for $329.

• Pre-orders can be made on Friday Oct. 26th.

What does all of this new Apple technology mean for education. First, Apple really wants to get all of the Education Business in every category. They want us to place all of our student textbooks in their devices (iPads or MacBooks) and they have created the software where publishers can produce stunning educational textbooks at a fraction of the paper version. If you have never seen an e-textbook look them up on the Applestore or iBooks and it will want you to go back to school again.

Second, they have priced the iPad mini within reach of most families and for manydistrict level technology departments to at least consider purchasing as a 1 to 1 device. The mini does everything that the earlier generations of iPads did but still they have faster processors, faster speeds, better images and more memory. The price is $329, and in my opinion they should have brought it in at $299 and then they would have had a monster hit with education.

Third, because of the mini iPad size and price point they will be a big selection for students and Christmas gifts. Apple I am sure has data somewhere that once a young person gets an iPhone or iPad of any version they are more likely to graduate up too being a lifetime Mac or Apple brand buyer forever. I know from my own experience as a PC user for over 30 plus years, my first real experience with an Apple product was my iPad and I was hooked. I now have all the attachments for the iPad, and wrote this article on it. I have an iPhone and am looking at buying my high school age daughter an iPad mini for Christmas. I really want to get the fourth generation iPad for my self (is that being selfish, I don’t know but I don’t think I want to answer that because I want it so badly.
Fourth reason, Teachers, admins, parents, and students are truly in the driver’s seat of education technology. That is perhaps one of the most exciting parts about the current edtech evolution happening. From online courses to K-12 project-based learning classrooms, technology is usually involved and, until now, has been sort of like+
cramming a round peg into a square hole.

Posted in app store, apple, iPad mini, ipads, mini, technology in classroom, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Expand Your Ipad

Expand the App Capacity of the Dock by Adding Folders on iPhone & iPad


Sep 3rd 2012


If you have more favorite apps than what fit in the iOS Dock by default (4 on iPhone, and 6 on iPad), do yourself a favor and place a folder of more frequently used apps into the Dock.

All you need to do is drag any folder to the Dock. Either rename an existing one or create a new folder by tapping and holding an app to drop atop another. Once in the Dock it will expand out in a similar way to how folders behave in the OS X Dock when viewed by the Grid setting:


This is more of a usability tip than much else, especially for anyone who wishes the iPhone or iPad Dock held more icons, or for anyone easily lost in a sea of app pages. For example, if you frequently use more than one iOS web browser, try adding a folder dedicated to all browsers instead of cluttering the Dock with all of them.

Folders have been around in iOS since version 4.0. If you ever create a bunch of folders and get tired of having all your apps in them, the easiest way to dump all apps back to the homescreen is by resetting the home screen layout.

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40 Tips for using Smartphones in your classroom with students

Your students have smartphones. If you’re looking for some simple and straightforward ways to easily integrate these powerful little devices into your classroom, look no further. The following 40 tips are simply that: tips. So use a few and toss the rest. However, be sure to try out at least one or two of them!

  1. Use educational apps:
    One of the simplest strategies for engaging students using smartphones involves taking advantage of the thousands of educational apps as supplements.
  2. Create educational apps:
    After familiarizing kiddos with properly navigating smartphone apps, challenge some of the more tech-oriented ones to design and develop their own; Stanford already offers an open-source class on the subject!
  3. Scavenger hunts:
    Smartphone scavenger hunts have proven a popular pastime for technophiles, and teachers have been known to use them to provide interactive lessons about everything from natural history to nature. It’s an easy concept to adapt!
  4. Shooting video:
    Whether requiring short PSAs, as the linked assignment does, or another type of video entirely, students with smartphones make it easier than ever to shoot, edit, and share their digital projects.
  5. Backchanneling:
    Turn the classroom into an educational MST3K equivalent by equipping smartphones with Twitter and allow students to offer up their own comments and ask questions via a real-time feed that does not disrupt the flow of a lecture.
  6. Project Noah:
    Biology educators love transforming their students into “citizen scientists” by asking them to snap photos and videos of their wilderness finds and sharing them with pros and fellow fans alike.
  7. Send reminders:
    Whether through text or apps like Remind 101, smartphones offer greater connectivity so teachers ensure students know when assignments are due, what materials to bring, test schedules, and more.
  8. Text message rewrites:
    In order to get younger readers more familiar with the ins and outs of classic texts — such asRomeo and Juliet in this example — some intrepid educators are assigning rewrites in abbreviated speech through text messaging. Translating old stories into contemporary vernacular nurtures a greater understanding of the major themes, characters, and plotlines.
  9. Record podcasts:
    With mobile audio technology, classrooms featuring podcasts can record and share their commentaries and interviews on the go
  10. Geocache:
    Similar to a scavenger hunt, only more involved and detailed, classroom geocaching projects encourage participants to keep the movement flowing by adding their own treasure chests for other users to track down.
  11. Accessibility:
    Explaining smartphone potential in creating greater accessibility for special needs students is an article in and of itself, as there are myriad applications for different requirements varying in severity.
  12. Remembering notes:Some teachers allow their students to snap photos of the chalkboard or whiteboard as class wraps up in case they couldn’t finish taking their notes fast enough.
  13. Access textbooks:For classrooms where the textbooks are available via the Internet or ebook readers, smartphones equipped with browsers and e-reading apps lower the back strain associated with toting everything around in bookbags.
  14. QR codes:Create QR codes and let students scan them for quick access to class materials, supplements, and anything else they might need to earn the best grades possible.
  15. Encourage literacy:
    Whether teaching ESL, special needs, or mainstream students, numerous apps, assignments, and smartphone features allow users to learn grammar, spelling, pronunciation, and other essential literacy skills.
  16. Organizers:
    Both teachers and students alike laud smartphones as portable, quick, and convenient strategy for staying on top of anything and everything related to schooling. No assignments necessary — they just plain work!
  17. Going paperless:
    Green up the classroom by converting as many class materials to digital as possible and encouraging students to store everything on their smartphones, tablets, computers, or other device.
  18. Preserving lectures:
    Shooting videos of lectures allows students who miss class or may not have caught something the first time around play catch up come exam time.
  19. Alarms and timers:
    Almost every smartphone these days comes with a timer and an alarm function, so flip it on when students must complete tasks within specific temporal boundaries.
  20. Crowdsourcing solutions:
    Assign each student (or, more realistically, student groups) a smartphone and ask them to network with other individuals (or groups) to share their findings about what they’ve learned with the hopes of formulating more viable approaches to classroom content.
  21. After-school programs:
    Rather than spending classroom time creating smartphone applications, some schools have started offering such training as an extracurricular activity in order to build lucrative skill sets and keep students away from dangerous decisions.
  22. Field research:
    Laptops are bulky, and many educators and students alike have taken to gathering research out in the field in order to better conserve their energy and available space.
  23. E-mail:
    Seeing as how most smartphones sync up with e-mail providers, it provides one more convenient communication conduit between teachers and students.
  24. Clickers:
    Instructors who love punctuating lectures with visuals like slideshows can convert their smartphones into tools for scrolling through materials.
  25. Animations:
    For content unsuitable for shooting video, equip smartphone devices with the proper resources needed to draw up animations depicting anything at all – though physics and science demonstrations work nicely.
  26. Google Maps:
    Available even on non-Android phones, Google Maps and similar applications provide numerous educational opportunities for geography and history classes in particular. Some teachers might even like the idea of drawing up virtual field trips students can participate in via their smartphones.
  27. Storyboarding:
    Have students draw or shoot photos of sequential images and challenge them to draw up their own stories or storyboards involving both text and visuals.
  28. Blogging:
    Blogging provides a wonderfully diverse tool for establishing a digital classroom, and it’s easy for teachers and students alike to post, comment, read, and follow analytics.
  29. Critical thinking:
    Ask students to open up their smartphone browsers and send them to fake websites meant to nurture in them vital critical thinking skills about parsing fact from fiction on the Internet and beyond.
  30. Emergency numbers:
    Because so many preschoolers and kindergartners love playing with their parents’ smartphones, some teachers have incorporated the devices into lessons about dialing their country’s respective emergency lines.
  31. Calculator:
    Calculators come standard on pretty much every smartphone these days, and multiple apps exist for ones that either don’t have them or lack more advanced functions. It should be fairly obvious what benefits they provide the classroom!
  32. Grading and feedback:
    Not only do smartphones allow for grading on the go, text and e-mail functions mean teachers have a way to ship feedback students can’t lose (or feed to their dogs) as easily as a sheet of paper.
  33. Memorization skills:
    Create and distribute digital flash cards so students can stay on top of what they need to know – or, better yet, make them write and trade their own! Research suggests that fusing technology with traditional methods helps nurture memorization skills, despite stereotypes of smartphone owners as forgetful types.
  34. Pagers:
    For medical students and the pros who pass their knowledge onto them, smartphones have largely replaced pagers as the go-to device when things get real. In fact, some teaching hospitals and med schools even require enrollees to own one.
  35. Science:
    Encourage students to be as Tesla as they can be with these hacks meant to teach and analyze acceleration via censor.
  36. Augmented reality:
    Whether via apps or something designed specifically for the class, augmented reality enhances the classroom experience and are easily accessed and created on smartphones.
  37. Take attendance:
    Some intrepid educators love location-based check-in games like Foursquare for taking attendance that can’t be faked or lost.
  38. Teaching digital literacy:
    Responsibly using smartphones instills in students the digital literacy skills necessary to succeed in current — and, likely, the foreseeable future — job markets, so get them started as early as resources allow!
  39. Polling:T
    ake quick surveys of what students think and want by asking them to respond via smartphone apps designed specifically for realtime feedback.
  40. Tours:
    OK, so technically this one isn’t the classroom, but it remains a great idea all the same. Some colleges, such as Berkeley, provide downloadable content allowing potential students to get to know the campus layout and history of the different features.
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Create a Mobile Language Lesson with QR Voice


by Mr. Byrne, freetech4teachers.com

January 9th 2012


I’ve seen QR Voice mentioned by a few other bloggers recently so I had to check it out for myself. QR Voice is a free tool that allows you to create QR codes that when scanned will play a short audio message. To create your message and QR code you can record a voice message by clicking the microphone icon on QR Voice or you can type in your message. Either way you’re limited to 100 characters. QR Voice is offered in Spanish, English, Japanese, and Portuguese.

I initially had trouble getting my messages to play back correctly, but after clearing the cache on my tablet’s browser QR Voice worked as it should. The app that I’m using to scan and decode QR codes is QR Droid.

Applications for Education
Teachers could use QR Voice to create QR codes that they then print and attach to objects in their classrooms or schools. Then have students try to identify those objects in the language that they’re trying to learn. To check their answers students can scan the QR code and hear the correct answer on their phones or tablets.

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30 Quick Ways To Use Mobile Phones In Classrooms

Your students have smartphones. If you’re looking for some simple and straightforward ways to easily integrate these powerful little devices into your classroom, look no further. The following 30 tips are simply that: tips. So use a few and toss the rest. However, be sure to try out at least one or two of them!

  1. Accessibility:
    Explaining smartphone potential in creating greater accessibility for special needs students is an article in and of itself, as there are myriad applications for different requirements varying in severity.
  2. Remembering notes:Some teachers allow their students to snap photos of the chalkboard or whiteboard as class wraps up in case they couldn’t finish taking their notes fast enough.
  3. Access textbooks:For classrooms where the textbooks are available via the Internet or ebook readers, smartphones equipped with browsers and e-reading apps lower the back strain associated with toting everything around in bookbags.
  4. QR codes:Create QR codes and let students scan them for quick access to class materials, supplements, and anything else they might need to earn the best grades possible.
  5. Encourage literacy:
    Whether teaching ESL, special needs, or mainstream students, numerous apps, assignments, and smartphone features allow users to learn grammar, spelling, pronunciation, and other essential literacy skills.
  6. Organizers:
    Both teachers and students alike laud smartphones as portable, quick, and convenient strategy for staying on top of anything and everything related to schooling. No assignments necessary — they just plain work!
  7. Going paperless:
    Green up the classroom by converting as many class materials to digital as possible and encouraging students to store everything on their smartphones, tablets, computers, or other device.
  8. Preserving lectures:
    Shooting videos of lectures allows students who miss class or may not have caught something the first time around play catch up come exam time.
  9. Alarms and timers:
    Almost every smartphone these days comes with a timer and an alarm function, so flip it on when students must complete tasks within specific temporal boundaries.
  10. Crowdsourcing solutions:
    Assign each student (or, more realistically, student groups) a smartphone and ask them to network with other individuals (or groups) to share their findings about what they’ve learned with the hopes of formulating more viable approaches to classroom content.
  11. After-school programs:
    Rather than spending classroom time creating smartphone applications, some schools have started offering such training as an extracurricular activity in order to build lucrative skill sets and keep students away from dangerous decisions.
  12. Field research:
    Laptops are bulky, and many educators and students alike have taken to gathering research out in the field in order to better conserve their energy and available space.
  13. E-mail:
    Seeing as how most smartphones sync up with e-mail providers, it provides one more convenient communication conduit between teachers and students.
  14. Clickers:
    Instructors who love punctuating lectures with visuals like slideshows can convert their smartphones into tools for scrolling through materials.
  15. Animations:
    For content unsuitable for shooting video, equip smartphone devices with the proper resources needed to draw up animations depicting anything at all – though physics and science demonstrations work nicely.
  16. Google Maps:
    Available even on non-Android phones, Google Maps and similar applications provide numerous educational opportunities for geography and history classes in particular. Some teachers might even like the idea of drawing up virtual field trips students can participate in via their smartphones.
  17. Storyboarding:
    Have students draw or shoot photos of sequential images and challenge them to draw up their own stories or storyboards involving both text and visuals.
  18. Blogging:
    Blogging provides a wonderfully diverse tool for establishing a digital classroom, and it’s easy for teachers and students alike to post, comment, read, and follow analytics.
  19. Critical thinking:
    Ask students to open up their smartphone browsers and send them to fake websites meant to nurture in them vital critical thinking skills about parsing fact from fiction on the Internet and beyond.
  20. Emergency numbers:
    Because so many preschoolers and kindergartens love playing with their parents’ smartphones, some teachers have incorporated the devices into lessons about dialing their country’s respective emergency lines.
  21. Calculator:
    Calculators come standard on pretty much every smartphone these days, and multiple apps exist for ones that either don’t have them or lack more advanced functions. It should be fairly obvious what benefits they provide the classroom!
  22. Grading and feedback:
    Not only do smartphones allow for grading on the go, text and e-mail functions mean teachers have a way to ship feedback students can’t lose (or feed to their dogs) as easily as a sheet of paper.
  23. Memorization skills:
    Create and distribute digital flash cards so students can stay on top of what they need to know – or, better yet, make them write and trade their own! Research suggests that fusing technology with traditional methods helps nurture memorization skills, despite stereotypes of smartphone owners as forgetful types.
  24. Pagers:
    For medical students and the pros who pass their knowledge onto them, smartphones have largely replaced pagers as the go-to device when things get real. In fact, some teaching hospitals and med schools even require enrollees to own one.
  25. Science:
    Encourage students to be as Tesla as they can be with these hacks meant to teach and analyze acceleration via censor.
  26. Augmented reality:
    Whether via apps or something designed specifically for the class, augmented reality enhances the classroom experience and are easily accessed and created on smartphones.
  27. Take attendance:
    Some intrepid educators love location-based check-in games like Foursquare for taking attendance that can’t be faked or lost.
  28. Teaching digital literacy:
    Responsibly using smartphones instills in students the digital literacy skills necessary to succeed in current — and, likely, the foreseeable future — job markets, so get them started as early as resources allow!
  29. Polling:T
    ake quick surveys of what students think and want by asking them to respond via smartphone apps designed specifically for realtime feedback.
  30. Tours:
    OK, so technically this one isn’t the classroom, but it remains a great idea all the same. Some colleges, such as Berkeley, provide downloadable content allowing potential students to get to know the campus layout and history of the different features.
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Top 5 Apps and Gadgets to Convert Your iPad into Writing Machine

When the iPad first came out, many believed it was more of a device meant to facilitate entertainment, but for those who fell in love with its portability, it quickly became the possibility of much more. A demand for more capabilities turned into useful applications that make an iPad a viable option for the professional or amateur writer. What was once your movie player, e-book reader, music player and organizational tool is now the ultimate writing machine. However, you will not be able to achieve this straight out of the box, because you will need the following applications and add-ons for your iPad:

Must Have Gadgets and iPad Apps for Writers

1. Note Taking and Word Processing Applications

One example of this is Evernote, which is much like a simplified word processor. One of the many useful features of many note taking and word processing applications is their ability to store information across many devices by utilizing cloud technology. This means that when you save and sync your note, all devices with the application contain your note or document. If you are looking for more than one option, take a look at iA Writer and Pages as well.

2. Keyboard Cases

One of the biggest hurdles to overcome when making the iPad into a tool for the writer is its lack of off-screen keyboard. If you are a serious writer, then the on-screen keyboard is not going to suffice. There are many options, but Kensington and Zaggfolio keyboard cases allow you to turn your iPad into somewhat of a laptop or netbook of sorts.

3. Storing Research in One Application

Pocket is an application that lives up to its name by allowing you to use your iPad as a pocket for web pages you wish to save for research purposes. This is a convenient way for a writer to store their research. You could almost consider it a type of Pinterest for writers and web researchers.

4. Applications for Reading E-books and Current News

Every writer needs to remain an avid reader to refine their craft. Kindle and Nook are both available for the iPad, and if you are looking for a news application that is all-inclusive, then Flipboard is an excellent choice.
 

5. Mind Mapping Application

Mind mapping is a useful tool and sometimes a necessity for writers. iThoughtsHD is an application that brings mind mapping capabilities to your iPad. Features of the application include cloud synchronization, the ability to save mind maps to a camera phone and the ability to hyperlink web pages to a mind map.

You probably have a set routine and a favorite device, or piece of modern technology you use to write, and the thought of considering another device is beyond comprehension. First, realize you are probably not alone in feeling this way. Next, consider seeking out a friend who owns an iPad or going to an Apple Store so you can try it out. You will not be able to see all of the above applications and add-ons, but you will be able to get an idea of whether the iPad could fit into your regular writing routine. There are also some other great tablets like iPad that may suit you better, so do not despair if this writing tool is not for you.

This post is written by Danielle Norrish, a talented writer being a full-time freelancer. Her current occupation is writing for a online resume builder website, where she collects all her knowledge into the resume building.

 

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